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at hardware. this is a show about science by scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge technology that can help to detect a concussion before it's too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. she was packaging that can one day replace polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. i'm phil torres, i study insects in peru. that's our team. let's do some science. ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over three-quarters of a million to settle a lawsuit. what was it about. >> there's a focus on the concussion problem. the nfl has thousands of place, and millions of players in youth and challenge football. i went to virginia tech to look at technology to test helmets and track hits on college and youth players. let's take a look. . >>> homecoming in the heartland. this is cornhusker county. nebraska university, the epicentre of college football. >> first big win. >> along with the tradition of football - come the hits. cheer cheer >> b
science in the world. we want to understand how life works at the detailed levels and apply that in terms of coming up with new insights to prevent and treat disease. >> we support tens of thousands of grants across the country conducted by the world's most cutting-edge scientist in the united states who are working on cancer, aids and other drugs. we are on a roll but there is a bit of an issue with the cuts. >> let's learn about the history. your roots date back to the late 1700s. but you were formed in 1887 as part of the department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? >> the current budget is about $29 billion. the number of people that work on the campus is about 17,000. most of the work is done by grants we give to the institutions across the country and globally. 85% is spent there in the universities where you are hearing about medical breakthroughs. >> how long have you been with nih? >> i came here 20 years ago, steve. asked to come lead the human genome project. in 2003, they laid out all three letters of the dna instruction book w
science by this is a show about science by scin histories. scin histories. kyle hill is an engineer, and kyle hill is an engineer, and he's investigating head-to-head he's investigating head-to-head combat and cutting edge combat and cutting edge technology that can help to technology that can help to detect a concussion before detect a concussion before it's it's too late. too late. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. >> lindsay moran is an ex-c.i.a. operative. operative. she was packaging that can one she was packaging that can one day replace day replace polysterene. polysterene. rachelle oldmixon specialises in rachelle oldmixon specialises in behaviours. behaviours. i'm i'm phil torres, i study insects phil torres, i study insects in peru. in peru. that's our team. that's our team. let's do some science. let's do some science. ♪ music ] ♪ music ] >> hi, guy, welcome back to >> hi, guy, welcome back to "techknow." "techknow." i'm phil torres, with rochelle, i'm phil torres, with rochelle, kyle and lindsay. kyle and lindsay. kyle, the nfl paid over kyle, the nfl paid over thre
research in the world. basicssion is to do science to understand how life works at the most detailed level and to apply that in terms of coming up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists in the u.s. who are working on things from cancer to hiv, two aides. you name it -- to aids. you name it. let's learn more about the history. your roots date back to the late of thebut you are part department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? guest: it is about $29 billion. the number of people who work about on the campus is 17,000. most of our work is done by the grants that we give to universities and institutions all over the country. not getur money does spent in bethesda, but gets spent in those great universities where you are hearing every day about medical breakthroughs. that is because nih supported the work. how long have you been at nih? guest: 20 years ago is when i got here. we were working on the human genome project. p
courage and enormous strength as well as he challenged us all to not just acknowledge the science of climate change, do understand that it is real and happening, but to also charge the cabinet to take immediate action. call me biased, but i believe it was his best speeches so far, although he is not done yet, i'm quite sure. climated through his action plan as well, which outlined some common sense, pragmatic steps that the epa and other agencies across the toinistration are now taking cut carbon pollution, invest in clean energy, to help our cities and towns build in more resilient ways so that they can add depth to a changing climate and keep our communities safe, but also to prepare to be a broader and more vocal leader on the issue of climate change in international discussions. as you know, in september, epa proposed urban pollution standards for new power plants using our authority that congress gave us under the clean air act. those power plant labor --ations our proposals regulations are proposals that would impact new facilities being constructed. new would ensure any fac
, home to a science station and under it's de facto control. these strategic waters and rocks are claimed by beijing and seuol. >> south korea has asserted rights in the air above. >> translator: the new korean air space defense identification zone has been modified to be in line with the country's flight information region, which does not overlap with neighboring countries. this zone includes the air space over iado's waters. >> seuol's move comes two wheys after china's surprise extension of its air identification zone encroaching on those of south korea and japan. it overlaps that of japan. the government in seuol says it won't impose the new rule until december 15th, allowing for consultation with neighbors. we believe this will not significantly impact our relationships with china and with japan as we try to work for peace and cooperation in northeast asia. >> south korea's president discussed the plans with u.s. vice president joe biden during his visit last week. the u.s. state department has declared itself on the same page as seoul. china release truck driver pictures of militar
the simulation center, which is opening in january. >> sure. the simulation center is part of our health sciences complex where you look at where medicine is going. we are trying to really force all of the education around medicine to be patient centric and make everyone realize you need a team approach. that also involves looking at using technology, to teach people how to do things. the way i was trained where i had to do one and then observe one, do one and teach one. we now have simulation for everything. unbelievable in terms of the technology. whoa have a mannequin who will deliver baby, et cetera. so it's extremely high tech. and that summation center, in my opinion, would be best in the midatlantic area when we open it in january. >> that sounds fascinating. >> absolutely. >> a mannequin delivering a baby? >> that's absolutely right. >> physical plant, new dorms, new buildings going up. >> that's right. two new residence halls are going up. atmosphere on the campus and keep as many of our students on the campus. it helps with student life. that's going on. i think again it will be a state
on a victim's h hymen as signs of abuse. now, science says a normal hymen may appear scarred. >> this year, a new texas law went into effect that allows state courts to overturn convictions that were based on science that's later debunked. so, on november 18th, the san antonio four reunited as free women lemeeting cas an draw's granddaughter for the first time and ready to make up for lost time. >> there was, you know, deaths in our family, and there was births. marriages and, you know just so many things over the years that we have -- that we have missed. >> the road ahead won't be easy. the women have been released but not exonerated of the there is that led battle to fight, jobs to find and lives to rebuild. the four say as long as they stick together, they will do all of that and more. heidi joe castro, al jazeera, san antonio. >>> hearing from the man behind the largest ponzi scheme in u.s. history bernie madoff, a man responsiblefo from stealing 50. says prison is like summer camp. he spoke out about how he beliefs investors should have known better. he says people asked me all the t
at mcdonald's anymore or burger king. none of the food tastes right. they had a science project to tell me how many people have food -- ieating good still eat chitlins. was 13.d smoking when i what is this stuff going on for? it is not making people live longer. it is making people live longer. the lifespan span in the united states is going up. sure what genetic modification has to do with that. if you are eating genetically modified foods, if you are eating foods from the supermarket, just from the produce section, the chances are you are not eating anything that is genetically modified. there is a long list of foods that are not genetically modified. the only ones that i know about for short that are available are the genetically out of five papaya from hawaii -- the only ones that i know about for sure that are available are the genetically modified papaya from hawaii. if you bought them from stateside supermarkets, they llyl come from genetica modified varieties. i have been told there are some squash that come from genetically modified varieties. the percentages, i have been told, are no
and that would have meant more support for girls in math and science because they were not doing as well as boys at one time and we managed to close that gap, that would have meant helping boys despite everything else, reading, writing, school engagement, classroom comportment, pretty good research, teachers have a bias against unruly students. understandable but these students can be 5 or 6 years old. i don't know if it is something we want to blame the boys for or punish them for, we want to make a classroom happy place for the manned room for their personalities and high spiritedness. we haven't done a good enough job with that. >> host: is there a shortage of male teachers and does this have an effect if there is? >> guest: there are few male teachers in elementary school. you have slightly more in high school but still this is a slight exaggeration but one critic of the current school system said schools are run by women for girls. an overstatement not my much. a lot feel that way. researchers interviewed boys, why did you leave school? why did you drop out? one little boy said i thought no
. down to a science. you're the reason we reformulated one a day women's. a complete multivitamin that now has extra b vitamins, which help convert food to energy. energy support for the things that matter. that's one a day women's. over the age of three have gum disease? so give your dog dentastix® as part of their oral care routine. dentastix® treats have a unique texture that's clinically proven to reduce up to 80% of tartar buildup. smile, it's dentastix® time! >>> checking our stop stories -- the deep freeze gripping half of the country is getting worse today, as snow moves into the south. temperatures in the rockies and dakotas dip into sub zero territory. >>> a widespread hack of facebook, twitter and gmail accounts may still be happening. >>> and workers in 100 u.s. cities are staging another day of protest today. they're demanding a $15 an hour minimum wage and the right to unionize. >>> aside from the cold, rain and snow in new mexico and arizona. a band of snow from oklahoma to ohio. heavy rain from texas to tennessee. wet in virginia. freezing rain for northern new
. the science gives us great reason for optimism. there are currently more than 30 safe and effective antiviral drugs and drug combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. what is more, we're making significant progress toward new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. with far fewer side effects. those regular min reduce the amount of hiv in the body. which helps people living with hiv stay healthy and live longer. and we also know from the nih funding research that hiv traps suggestion is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an infected person is reduced to undetectable leaflets. meanwhile partner agency at the fda has approved new rapid diagnostic test that can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv infected individuals who might not be tested in traditional health care settings. now as we speak, nih grant ees and scientists are exploring way to treat hiv infection by administrating hiv antibiotic. and they have begun early stage human testing of an antibody that was effective in producting human cells against more than
of the way the transition system operates in the science cost and i'm concerned that under order 1,000, ferc is defining the benefits so broadly into spreading the cost so wisely that the simple action has no meaning anymore. chairwoman lafleur, please explain the idea of the beneficiary pay and what that should mean and keep in mind i don't want my constituents. i know you can't address the merits of the individual complaints filings under the 1,000 but there is a leave of the point i would like to raise with you that i think stands on its own which i hope you will be able to respond. >> thank you congressman. the order 1,000 required to plan cooperatively across the region as the region encompassing pennsylvania already does. and take into account three kinds of benefits. reliability benefits, which can be hard to quantify that are very real, the needing public policy requirements to connect to resources that the states require them to connect which are normally identified by the states such as pennsylvania which is a renewable portfolio standard, and a third congestion benefits to reduce
work and some math and science, just about anyone can become one. this week is your chance to give it a shot, and don't let anyone tell you can't. jon: white house says they are making progress with healthcare.gov. they're just not there yet. jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. peter, thank you. jon: there is growing outcry over what many see as an unintended side-effect of obamacare. to try to contain costs many of the new insurance plans are severely limiting access to some of the nation's top hospitals including two world-renowned cancer centers. joining us for more on all of this, bob cusack, managing editor for "the hill." we'll get to the hospital access question in just a second, bob but what do you think, first of all, of the newly-redesigned obamacare website? >> i think the story is shifting a little bit from the website problems because it is still getting better but as peter mentioned there still are problems but now the story is shifting to cost. remember the administration obamacare would reduce costs. certainly there will be winners and losers here. if you can't
evacuated from a science lab for a short time. paramedics evaluated several people at the scene. they are hoping $1,000 will help solve a crime. a woman is followed boy a man in northwest d.c. moments after, she was raped and assaulted by that man. a local business owner is putting up $1,000 of his own money to convince anyone who knows something about that noon come for the and tell police. smith is take doing this because he is tired he said of seeing all the unsolved crime in washington including one of his own. last year he was shot in the face while being robbed near the capital. >> it went in ander to this up and came out on the side over here. >> so far police do not have any leads on the assault and the rape. if you recognize the attacker in the video, you are asked to contact mpd before trying to get in touch with smith. >> gunfire resulted in an arrest of man early sunday morningful according to metro transit, two men were arguing on a maryland-bound train. the argument became heated and man instruct other man with it. they shattered a window of the train and no one wa
at home, students showed little improvement over the previous tests, scoring 481 in math, 497 in science and 498 in reading. they failed to make the top 20 list in any subject. today, education secretary, arne duncan called it a sign of educational stagnation. >> the brutal truth, that reality, must serve as a wake-up call against educational complacency. the problem is not that our 15-year-olds are performing worse today than before, the problem is that they are simply not making progress. >> the tests also show that students in several countries that lag behind the u.s. back in 2009 now outperform american students in many key categories. the global exam is given every three years to more than half a million students. >>> sounds like a dream on wheels. it's in production in our area. 261 miles to the gallon. you can fill up once and drive for weeks or longer. northern virginia bureau reporter, david culver gives us a look at the car of the future. >> reporter: we are at volkswagen headquarters for you. look at the xl-1. this is the newest edition. the woman with the keys is telling us
planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. because you can't beat zero heartburn. woo hoo! [ male announcer ] prilosec otc is the number one doctor recommended frequent heartburn medicine for 8 straight years. one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. the day building a play set begins with a surprise twinge of back pain... and a choice. take up to 4 advil in a day or 2 aleve for all day relief. [ male announcer ] that's handy. ♪ and you work hard to get to the next level. it feels good when you reach point b, but you're not done. for you, "b" is not the end. capella university will take you further, because our competency-based curriculum gives you skills you can apply immediately, to move your career forward. to your point "c." capella university. start your journey at capella.edu. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident fo
for computer skype tists and a leap for explorers and researchers. >>. >> i know it's meant for science, but it looks like it will be great to watch tv on. >> michael eaves will run down the big game. >> hundreds gather to mark a 33rd anniversary of nelson mandela's death. more when we return. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. an act of terror then a rush to justice for pan am flight 103. >> the eyes of the world will be on us. >> an investigation under scrutiny. >> it looks nothing like him. somebody's telling lies. >> this was a miscarriage of justice. >> did they get the wrong man? >> there's something else going on. >> a shocking documentary event begins with: the pan am bomber on al jazeera america presents. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with a quick look at the top stories. >> people across south africa and the world are honouring the legacy of nelson mandela. religious services are hold across the globe to remember one of the greatest leaders of our time. increasing tensions in asia
and sciences. a former director of the leon leavy center for buying agraph in new york. she teaches in the msa programs of the new school glover columbia university school of the arts and has taught sarah lawrence college and union college in new yorkie she was washington irving professor of modern literary. please welcome brenda wineapple and nathaniel philbrick. [applause] >> on my way over here, nathaniel and i talked about how both of these subjects are obviously the most -- among the most notable eras of american history. how could we characterize a comparative deal between your book and brenda's when it comes to intensity, and relevance, where both in the revolution and the civil war. there wasn't very much of a clear future in either era. >> i was thinking about this question when i heard about the great opportunity to be paired with brenda, and my bunker hill begins actually -- begins and ends with john quincy adams. it begins with him at seven years old, standing on a hill with his mother, then in her early 30s, on june 17, 1775, watching the battle of bunker hill from a hill about 12
lover of science and philosophy so that was an early influence because raising me in california there were all sorts of influences but i had lessons and i took latin and french and i think we had a fight with the school system because with latin and spanish and french they said you can't take three language and my mother managed to turn this california school into a little prep school on the east coast. so a very strong influence on me. .. strong influence postmark before we go to call, how did you end up at the american enterprise university? >> guest: once i was on tenure, i went on a ship that went around the world and it's about 30 professors in the wonderful program. i was friends with all of them. i liked all of the teachers but they were certainly didn't radical. it was marxist, and this was in 1988. the soviet union was intact and yugoslavia was celebrated as a model society. so long story short i came off the ship and wrote an essay called the professor at sea. especially since it was so colorful. teaching these young women that they were oppressed and again, i found it
never told us very much. she's also a senior fellow for science and international affairs committee member of the policy board. she cofounded the center for the new american security think tank that you all know and she is a member of the aspen strategy group. so, zelikow is a professor of history at the university of virginia and is also the dean leading the graduate school of arts and sciences. >> i'm going to put that on my resume. i like that. soon after they became a trial and appellate lawyer in texas doing for mobile justice and civil rights work. there is so much more here. he was an adviser to secretary of state condoleezza rice. when i first met him, the council of the department of state he's a member of the president's intelligence advisory board and he was for president bush and president obama and he has written a number of books. germany unified. statecraft is a good one. he wrote that with condoleezza rice and most importantly he is a member of the aspen strategy group that he directed from 2,000 to 2003. i will sort by asking michele and fill up a few questions and
as a manageable medical condition. the science gives us great reason for optimism and hope. there are currently more than already safe and effective antiretrovirals drugs and combinations. researchers continue to develop new treatments. what is more, we're making progress to new medications and regimens that are longer lasting and simpler to use. far fewer side effects. those regimens reduce the amount of hiv in the body. that helps people living with hiv to stay healthy and live longer. we also know from the nih funding research, hiv transmission is drastically reduced when the amount of hiv virus in an affected person is reduced to undetectable levels. meanwhile, our partner agency, the fda, has approved new, rapid diagnostic test which can be used in a variety of settings to identify hiv in an infected individual. it might not be tested in a traditional health care setting. as we speak, nih grantees and scientists are exploring ways to treat hiv infections by administering anti-hiv antibodies. they have begun early-stage testing of an antibody that was effective in protecting human cells aga
attention to a new report from the nation's premiere scientific body, the national academy of sciences. we typically associate climate change with gradual, longer term problems. according to the academy, climate change could also pose a risk of rapid hard to predict environmental changes that have the potential to cause widespread damage in the near term. the report warns that the collapse of the polar sea ice could send sea levels soaring. the destruction of the coral reefs could cause mass extinction of sea life, the elimination of summer sea ice in the arctic could alter the world's weather patterns. these tipping points could happen suddenly. it's reckless to do nothing in face of these threats. if there is a 10% chance that these threats would happen, it's irresponsible for us to ignore it. dr. richard alley, one of the authors said, you can't see it coming. you can't prepare for it. congress is irresponsible if we don't take this issue seriously. to pass on our planet worthy of our children and grandchildren's future. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. . the n
now because they buy most of them and the science and what used to be a very inno vative industry is extremely slow and waiting a decade or more to get vaccines through and it's tragic, this is one of the best, best -- the tort system was a problem too but they passed a law changing that. and that's a very bad sign that these very important medications. >> if we were able to do away with the loopholes and get some things passed in congress and work with the technology that we have and use innovation at its best, where could we be today? >> i have -- i discuss these in more detail in my book, but i have not the slightest doubt they have the technology to beat cancer. this is said many times in the past. now with cancers, they do just quite stunning things, they find out what are the targets on the cancer cells and study them and go after them with two structure based designs, throw a bunch of biochemists at it and design a molecule or monoclone anti-bodies and most recently they've actually begun extracting white blood cells from patients and engineering those right down to target
recognizes the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the science space and technology committee recently held a hearing on healthcare.gov cybersecurity threats. our bipartisan expert witness panel included dr. frederick check, a computer science professor at s.m.u., dr. ruben, a computer science professor at johns hopkins university, david kennedy, former chief security officer of dibold incorporated and currently the principal security consultant for trusted sec, and morgan write, formerly with cisco security and now c.e.o. of crowd sourced investigations. now i'm not a cybersecurity expert, but i can read the words of those who are. the s.s.t. committee's hearing charter informs members that in order to fully use healthcare.gov, american citizens must input or verify highly personal information such as date of birth and social security numbers for all family members, household salary, debt information, credit card information, place of employment, home addresses, and the like. information that is a treasure-trove for cybercriminals and identity thieves
? >> no, no, it was part of the science experiment. >> oh okay. >> rapid lake and foam and stuff. make sure it didn't break. >> you weren't doing it just you know to be mean. that was last week. >> that was last week exactly. all right. we have some very cool video speaking of cool video. it snowed so much in the southwest it filled up the grand canyon. just kidding. that's fog. it doesn't happen too often. fog is a cloud on the ground. made up of water droplets and not vapor and these are really spectacularriccages from the grand -- images from the grand canyon. that's like another planet isn't it? >> it does, it looks majestic. >> very cool. okay live look outside. it is our live michael & son weather cam. very comfortable still. 55 degrees. that's a bargain for this time of night and also for this time of day. oh by the way the sunset -- already set at 4:46 but will:46 is the earliest sunset time we have by december 12th it will start setting later. okay? so -- winds calm. pressure falling a little bit. 30.03. satellite picture and radar combined still have some snow pulling out of
retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> "lose a boss" segment tonight. unemployment's dropped from 7.3% to 7%. good news for the country. in other economic developments, more than 4 million americans have been out of work more than four months, more than 11 million are looking for jobs and wages are stagnant. here to put it in perspective, fox business anchor lou dobbs. so, the jobs situation's getting better? >> absolutely, it is getting better. it's slow, it's incremental. it's barely better than a year ago, but it is better, and we're seeing -- >> is it better because of christmas, though? is that what this november number is? >> no, no. >> people hire for christmas. >> no, because what we're seeing, bill, over the last three years, we are seeing a steady increase, and i'm talking about 5,000 jobs a month, just about, improvement in job creation. >> what kind of jobs are they? >> we're talking now about manufacturing jobs coming back as well as services. >> and why is this happening? >> it's happening because fundam
for retirement and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. losing thrusters. i need more power. give me more power! [ mainframe ] located. ge deep-sea fuel technology. a 50,000-pound, ingeniously wired machine that optimizes raw data to help safely discover and maximize resources in extreme conditions. our current situation seems rather extreme. why can't we maximize our... ready. ♪ brilliant. let's get out of here. warp speed. ♪ >>> what a story. we're back, of course with this one. in the days following the death of nelson mandela, some conservatives have trotted out old smears against the former south african leader. now two of the republicans' biggest rabble-rousers have found themselves the biggest targets for publicly praising mandela. gingrich paid tribute on facebook saying quote, president nelson mandela was one of the greatest leaders of our life time. his thoughtful, disciplined but friendly personality made him a leader who could define the right policies and behaviors. nelson mandela was trul
news now." you know, from a young age. i definitely want to major in political science. become the mayor or something. make the situation better for other people. my name is justin, and i am your dividend. ♪ c is for cookie ♪ ♪ c is for cookie that's good enough for me ♪ c is for cookie that's good enough for me ♪ cookie cookie cookie starts with c ♪ >> y is for yummy. marble cookie day and when there is food involved it is always our favorite story of the day. >> took a trip to manhattan to find how they make the maple bacon cookie for this week's edition of "onsome nikkei kitchen." >> reporter: insomniacs we're in the kitchen today with zachary. he is the owner and manufacturer of schmackary's . it smells so good. wish you were here. ♪ >> today, i'm going to show you how to make one of our infamous cookies here, maple bacon. start with the butter and put it in the mixer here and brown and white sugar in here. we're going to let that get nice and creamy in there. that's when we are going to add our eggs and when we will get the first dose of maple.
, america scores 26th in math. 17th in reading and 21 in science. >> okay. it may be average in most areas, but it did rank near the top in spending at number five. >> yes. >> are we getting most bang for our buck here? >> so this is a little troubling. the report notes that spending does not necessarily correlate to higher scores. so the united states spends between the ages of 6 and 15 $115,000 per student. to put that in some context, the slovak republic has scores similar to ours, and they only spend $53,000. >> that's extraordinary when you think about how much we're spending and what we're getting. the importance of these findings, julia, put this into perspective. what does it say about our educational system, and should we be worried about those low math scores and the way we're coming in against everybody else on pretty much every other barometer? >> so it is a little bit concerning, but to put it in more context, the united states has never really done well on these sorts of international assessments. since the '60s and '70s, we've scored in the middle or bottom of international
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. like a squirrel stashes nuts, you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® liquid gels. nothing starts working faster than zyrtec® at relieving your allergy symptoms for 24 hours. zyrtec®. love the air. [ male announcer ] this december, experience the gift of true artistry and some of the best offers of the year at the lexus december to remember sales event. this is the pursuit of perfection. ♪ >>> let's take a look at the morning papers from our parade of papers. the "l.a. times," ukraine's president is facing a 48 hour deadline to disband his government. anti-government protesters toppled a statue of lenin, the founder of the vote union. the protesters warn they will target the president's home next if he doesn't disband the government. demonstrators are rallying against the government's decision to walk away from a european union trade deal to keep close ties with russia. >> "chicago tribune," the extraordinary achievements of the 2013 kennedy center honorees were celebrated last night in washington. recipients included
of the social sciences research network. the third witness is simon lazarus senior counsel with the accountability center. he's a member of the administrative conference of the united states and during his career he served as the public policy counsel for the national senior citizens law center as a partner at powell goldstein and associate director of president carter white house domestic policy staff. mr. lazarus has written articles that appeared in journals as well as publications such as the atlantic, the "washington post" and the new republic. our final witness is michael cannon of the health policy studies. he has been recognized as an influential expert on the affordable care act. mr. cannon has appeared on abc, cbs, cnn and fox news and has written articles that have been featured in numerous newspapers including "the wall street journal," usa today and the "los angeles times." he is also the coeditor of a book on replacing the portable care act and the co-author of a book on healthcare reform. i would like to thank all of the witnesses today. each of the written s
ranking of students around the world, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 of reading, math, and science. randi weingarten says that that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other developed countries. hour.s just over one >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers.
in agricultural sciences and earning his masters in business from delaware valley college, eric went to work for the pennsylvania department of agriculture. there he administered the rural youth grant program, led the county fair and agri tourism division and director for the central office in that department. he holds several leadership roles in the marcellus shale coalition, bringing together the two most important industries, energy and agriculture. eric is well deserving of this honor and we thank him for his leadership in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on
in the united states, saying it is the transportation and science committee -- as we move forward towards integrating drones into civilian life and capitalizing on the economic opportunities they offer, we must make certain that these aircraft's meet rigorous safety and privacy standards. the commerce committee said the hearing was already in the works before the amazon announcement on sunday. her knees from hartsdale, new -- bernice from hartsdale, new york on our support line. favor of using the drones because i just enrolled in a prescription d plan on medicare. i will get the best price if i use mail order to obtain my drugs. i take 14 prescription drugs. it is very difficult to keep things in order. in order to get the prescription i haveelivered on time, to call two weeks ahead of time. it seems insurmountable. however, if i saw that i was running out of drugs and they could be delivered in a half hour, it would be most helpful. i think for old ladies on prescription d, it might be a help. host: that is bernice from new york. this,ve probably heard but -- dylan from alabama, you are
, no matter how science fiction it feels to think about that happening, it could easily happen and it is our job to stop it. host: we have this tweet from calamity jane -- host: what do you say to that argument? syria rightis in now as a proxy terrorist. they are in all of these places doing bad things. they are in afghanistan. they have not invaded because that is not what these countries do. what these countries -- by these countries i mean countries like , they have proxy terrorists. they fund, promote, and train bad actors in their state and then send them out to other countries to destabilize. front page this morning of "the new york times." "jihadist groups gain turmoil across the middle east, planning violence to present new opportunities for jihadist groups across the middle east to raise concerns among american intelligence and counterterrorism officials that militants aligned with al qaeda could establish a base in syria capable of threatening israel and europe. -- europe." guest: that is absolutely true, especially in syria. you have a line from syria to iraq. that is how they get
this from our abc stations. you know, from a young age. i definitely want to major in political science. become the mayor or something. make the situation better for other people. my name is justin, and i am your dividend. ♪ >> classic. love that song. >> even in the barking fashion. >> yep. >> what do you get when you mix jingle bell holiday spirit with a bouncing new puppy. >> at the white house it wasn't canine carolling but it added to the festivities. the first lady kicked off the holiday season at the executive mansion. and of course anything involving a puppy usually makes it "our favorite story of the day." here's mary bruce. >> reporter: someone maybe a little too excited for the holidays. sunny, the newest member of the obama fami, join ♪ >> classic. love that song. >> even in the barking fashion. >> yep. >> what do you get when you mix jingle bell holiday spirit with a bouncing new puppy. >> at the white house it wasn't canine carolling but it added to the festivities. the first lady kicked off the holiday season at the executive mansion. and of course anything involving
point. it's protruding new coal-fired generation in this country spent the science that tells us we've got to reduce carbon pollution and the economics are telling us the exact same thing. and about the state of florida where now taxpayers will have to invest and are already investing huge sums of money to begin to adapt to a changing climate. think about the huge bills, the bills that come to every time have an extreme weather event, whether it's drought or super storms. and i would think that the utility industry also sees the writing on the wall, they're looking for the certainty and the more aggressive we are moving away from carbon intensive energy generation, the better. thank you very much. ..e gentleman from west virginia mr. mckinley for five minutes. >> chairman lafleur, perhaps you can give me some direction on this. we have a growing problem in west virginia with the various constituents. currently a lot of it has to be shipped. a lot of it is being wasted which is a shame. that doesn't benefit the consumer and doesn't help the environment any. my question is what i am h
. >> the science and the economics as well tells us we've got to reduce carbon pollution and the economics are telling us the exact same thing you think about the state of florida where now the tax payers have to invest in are already investing huge sums of money to begin to adapt to a changing climate. think about the huge bill, the bills that come due every time we have an extreme weather events whether it is a drought or super storm. i would think that utility industry also sees the writing on the wall if they are looking for that certainty and the more aggressive we are on moving away from the carbon intensive energy generation, the better. >> the gentle ease time is expired. this time recognize the gentleman from west virginia mr. mckinley for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. chairman lafleur perhaps you can give me some direction on this. we have a growing problem in west virginia with the production of the various constituents with ngl that we can't use this as only the local market. it has to be shipped. currently a lot of it is just wasted which is a shame and doesn't ben
plant et, science. overall strategy was, make discovery and tlc stronger but invest in a lot of new channels, velocity's another new channel. market share has grown to 11% of viewership on cable. we grew our portfolio 4% in a mark that's flat. year before we were up six. the year before up four. >> do you think you can keep doing it? >> that's the question. >> we think we can. this year we grew four. and we still believe, if you tell great stories with great characters under a strong brand, more people will watch. in the u.s. we're going continue to do that. i think we can continue to win. on tonigp of that in the u.s. viewership has flattened out and subscribers have flattened out. the advertising mark remains strong. the ability to get cpm growth when the differential between the broadcast cpm and cable still significant, it's a big helper. and in the u.s., we're getting paid more money for our content. we have netflix and amazon buying content. ability to get higher subfees from the distributors in the u.s. has gotten better. >> there may be weakness in the scatter mark, have you
and not tap water was more science fiction. this week on tuesday, the house voted to extend that law. sorry. got a little teleprompter screw up here. i'm reading the same thing over and over again. but the -- it is on to the senate now, and what is -- what makes it so complicated in the senate is the fact that senators are basically -- some senators, particularly democratic senators, who are saying that the law doesn't go far enough as it is currently written. so the question now, the dilemma now, that the senate faces is do you pass this law, do you renew this law that was created in 1988, take the attention you can get on that for another ten years, or do you wage a fight, push a fight here, saying we want this law to go farther, we want new provisions in there that would make it impossible for guns that would be printed on the new 3d printers that are coming out, that would make it impossible for those guns to pass through airport security. so that is the dilemma that they are -- that they are facing. now to give you a little history and context for this, you have to go back to the last
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